The LinkedIn Password Hack: Examining Terrible Passwords

​On Wednesday, June 6th, a Russian hacker claimed to have stolen over 6.5 million LinkedIn passwords. Some of the passwords (without their associated usernames) were posted online. Mashable and other news outlets have already covered the topic in great detail, so I thought I’d approach it from a different angle and browse through some of the (alleged) list of cracked passwords.

On Wednesday, June 6th, a Russian hacker claimed to have stolen over 6.5 million LinkedIn passwords. Some of the passwords (without their associated usernames) were posted online. Mashable and other news outlets have already covered the topic in great detail, so I thought I’d approach it from a different angle and browse through some of the (alleged) list of cracked passwords.

A couple of different sites have popped up that allow you to securely check if your password was leaked. I spent some time typing in random passwords to see if there were among the list. Note: Even if your password was not on the list, you should still change it.

Here’s a list of some passwords that were compromised:

  • linkedin (I’m guessing these people use ‘facebook’ as their FB login)
  • 8675309 (I guess a lot of people like that Tommy Tutone song)
  • ihatemyjob (we hope this never gets out to your bosses or you might need some reputation management help)
  • chucknorris (even the great Chuck Norris can’t protect you from hackers)
  • password (yup, people still use that one)
  • wordpass (nope, this one’s not any better)

Here’s a list of some passwords that were not on the list. Note: this doesn’t mean that the following passwords are any more secure than the words in the compromised list. You can click here to determine how secure your current password is.

  • didierdrogba (he scored a goal in the Champions League final for Chelsea)
  • 3password12 (did you know that adding numbers, punctuation marks and capital letters will make your password much more secure?)
  • theinternet (hmm…)

Hopefully these lists will spur some of you with weak passwords to make up more secure passwords. Most hacking programs don’t actually care if your password is a real word or a jumble of letters; a lengthy password with at least one capital letter, number and/or punctuation marks is the best way to go.

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